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Punctuating Hong Kong’s Central and Western District Promenade, which runs along Victoria Harbor, is the bright pink Garden Fork (Magenta)(2017) by Irish-British conceptual artist MICHAEL CRAIG-MARTIN. The work turns a familiar object into an uncanny four-meter-tall sculpture that also acts as a graphic drawing—a flattened image—against the backdrop of the city, playfully blending into the colorful and loud carnival adjacent to the promenade. All photos by Julee WJ Chung for ArtAsiaPacific.

The Hong Kong Arts Center opened the city’s first international sculpture park to the public on February 22. Harbour Arts Sculpture Park stretches along Victoria Harbor and overlooks the Kowloon peninsula, providing visitors with a sanctuary at the heart of the city’s financial hub. Despite the rain, the park launched on a celebratory note. Following his opening speech, Tim Marlow, co-curator and artistic director of London’s Royal Academy of Arts, gave a toast to the artists whose creativity illuminate our lives: “The importance of artists to the cultural life of the city is sometimes overlooked […] One of the joys of this exhibition project was to encounter works by some Hong Kong artists that I already knew, and other that I didn’t. There is a very vital (and important) creative hub in this city, and if you give artists both international and local opportunity to show their work and engage with a broader audience, they do extraordinary things.”

Led by Marlow and Fumio Nanjo, the director of Tokyo’s Mori Art Museum and Hong Kong Art School’s international programs, the inaugural exhibition highlights the sculptures of 19 emerging and established artists. Among them are multimedia Hong Kong artists Morgan Wong and Wong Chi-Yung, Pakistani-British artist Rasheed Araeen, multidisciplinary South-Korean artist Gimhongsok, Chinese artists Zhan Wang and Zheng Guogu, Japanese artist and performer Yayoi Kusama, British artists Tracy Emin and Michael Craig-Martin, and New York-based Hank Willis Thomas, among many others. The selected works were given prominent grounds to make visual art more accessible to, and integrated with, the larger community.

Accompanying the seven-week presentation will be public programs, workshops and educational activities. Here are some highlights from the 2018 edition of Harbour Arts Sculpture Park, which runs through April 11 at the Central and Western District Promenade and parts of Wanchai.

The work of British sculptor ANTONY GORMLEY returns to Hong Kong after his controversial installations graced the city’s public spaces in 2015. Daze VI (2016), is a part of an ongoing series of works, in which the artist depicts a life-size figure with several volumes of cast iron blocks. The precarity of the stack of cubes suggests the statue’s perpetual movement, while the figure’s posture, which twists backwards from its narrow ankles, alludes to a sense of uncertainty regarding the future.
The work of British sculptor ANTONY GORMLEY returns to Hong Kong after his controversial installations graced the city’s public spaces in 2015. Daze VI (2016), is a part of an ongoing series of works, in which the artist depicts a life-size figure with several volumes of cast iron blocks. The precarity of the stack of cubes suggests the statue’s perpetual movement, while the figure’s posture, which twists backwards from its narrow ankles, alludes to a sense of uncertainty regarding the future.
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Julee WJ Chung is the assistant editor of ArtAsiaPacific.

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